Knowledge is Bower

don't be dumber. be smarter.

Jul 20
The Black Sun by M. K. Čiurlionis, acquired by Igor Stravinsky and lost since 1920

The Black Sun by M. K. Čiurlionis, acquired by Igor Stravinsky and lost since 1920


Jul 19

Voltaire’s Body

ingridrichter:

Nobody knows where the body of Voltaire is. It was stolen from its tomb in the nineteenth century and has never been recovered. The theft was discovered in 1864, when the tomb was opened and found empty.

2201 Fascinating Facts by David Louis, 1983.


Jun 28

grofjardanhazy:

More: Great Moments In Bicycle-Powered Warfare

War is an ugly business, in which whoever moves fastest and strikes first often triumphs. So long before there were tanks and planes, people used bicycles to rush into combat. For decades, people experimented with machine guns on bikes, military quadricycles, and bicycle infantry. Here are the greatest moments of pedal-powered battle strategy.

(via new--tomorrows)


Jun 22

likeafieldmouse:

Famous Notebooks

1. Mark Twain - “He had his leather bound notebooks custom made according to his own design idea. Each page had a tab; once a page had been used, he would tear off its tab, allowing him to easily find the next blank page for his jottings”

2. Charles Darwin - “The notebooks were filled with memorandum to himself on things to look further into, questions he wanted to answer, scientific speculations, notes on the many books he was currently reading, natural observations, sketches, and lists of the books he had read and wanted to read. But the progression is far from orderly: the entries are chaotically arranged and wide-ranging; they jump from one scientific subject to the next and are interspersed with notes on correspondences and conversations. He would rest the notebook on his desk and write horizontally down the page with a pen, and, like Isaac Newton, he would sometimes start in from both ends of the notebook at once and work towards the middle.

3. Jack Kerouac - The notebook entry reads: 

“Ginsberg — intelligent enuf, interested in the outward appearance & pose of great things, intelligent enuf to know where to find them, but once there he acts like Jerry Newman, the photographer anxious to be photographed photographing —— Ginsberg wants to run his hand up the backs of people, for this he gives and seldom takes — He is also a mental screwball

*(Tape recorder anxious to be tape recorded tape recording) (like Seymour Barab anxious to have his name in larger letters than Robert Louis Stevenson, like Steinberg & Verlaine Rimbaud Baudelaire”

4. Ernest Hemingway - The notebook entry reads:

“My name is Ernest Miller Hemingway

I was born on July 21, 1899

My favorite authors are Kipling, O. Henry and Steuart Edward White.

My favorite flower is lady slipper and tiger lily.

My favorite sports are trout fishing, hiking, shooting, football and boxing.

My favorite studies are English, zoology and chemistry.

I intend to travel and write.”

(via lost-in-centuries-long-gone)


Jun 21
“Philosophers’ ships is the collective name for ships which transported intellectuals expelled from Soviet Russia in 1922. The main load was handled by two German ships, the Oberbürgermeister Haken and the Preussen, which transported more than 160 expelled Russian intellectuals in September and November 1922 from Petrograd to Stettin in Germany (now in Poland). Three detention lists included 228 people, 32 of them students. In 1923 other intellectuals were transported by train to Riga in Latvia or by ship from Odessa to Constantinople.”

Philosophers’ ships - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Oberburgermeister_Haken.jpg/250px-Oberburgermeister_Haken.jpg


Jun 20
europeanarchitecture:

St. Peter and St. Paul’s Church/ Šv. apaštalų Petro ir Povilo bažnyčia - architects Jan Zaor and Giambattista Frediani, interior stucco mouldings by Giovanni Pietro Perti and ornamentation by Giovanni Maria Galli, Vilnius, Lithuania (by John Schermer)

europeanarchitecture:

St. Peter and St. Paul’s Church/ Šv. apaštalų Petro ir Povilo bažnyčia - architects Jan Zaor and Giambattista Frediani, interior stucco mouldings by Giovanni Pietro Perti and ornamentation by Giovanni Maria Galli, Vilnius, Lithuania (by John Schermer)


Jun 19
the-paintrist:

iamthecrime:

Manguin, Henri (French, 1870-1943) - View of the Mont Ventoux - 1911 (by *Huismus)

Mont Ventoux (Ventor in Provençal) is a mountain in the Provence region of southern France, located some 20 km northeast of Carpentras, Vaucluse. On the north side, the mountain borders the Drôme département. It is the largest mountain in the region and has been nicknamed the “Beast of Provence”, the “Giant of Provence”, or “The Bald Mountain”. It has gained fame through its use in the Tour de France cycling race.
As the name might suggest (venteux means windy in French), it can get windy at the summit, especially with the mistral; wind speeds as high as 320 km/h (200 mph) have been recorded. The wind blows at 90+ km/h (56+ mph) 240 days a year. The road over the mountain is often closed due to high winds. Especially the “col de tempêtes” (“storm pass”) just before the summit, which is known for its strong winds. The real origins of the name are thought to trace back to the 1st or 2nd century AD, when it was named ‘Vintur’ after a Gaulish god of the summits, or ‘Ven-Top’, meaning “snowy peak” in the ancient Gallic language. In the 10th century, the names Mons Ventosus and Mons Ventorius appear.
Mont Ventoux, although geologically part of the Alps, is often considered to be separate from them, due to the lack of mountains of a similar height nearby. It stands alone to the north of the Luberon range, separated by the Monts de Vaucluse, and just to the east of the Dentelles de Montmirail, its foothills. The top of the mountain is bare limestone without vegetation or trees, which makes the mountain’s barren peak appear from a distance to be snow-capped all year round (its snow cover actually lasts from December to April). Its isolated position overlooking the valley of the Rhône ensures that it dominates the entire region and can be seen from many miles away on a clear day.

the-paintrist:

iamthecrime:

Manguin, Henri (French, 1870-1943) - View of the Mont Ventoux - 1911 (by *Huismus)

Mont Ventoux (Ventor in Provençal) is a mountain in the Provence region of southern France, located some 20 km northeast of Carpentras, Vaucluse. On the north side, the mountain borders the Drôme département. It is the largest mountain in the region and has been nicknamed the “Beast of Provence”, the “Giant of Provence”, or “The Bald Mountain”. It has gained fame through its use in the Tour de France cycling race.

As the name might suggest (venteux means windy in French), it can get windy at the summit, especially with the mistral; wind speeds as high as 320 km/h (200 mph) have been recorded. The wind blows at 90+ km/h (56+ mph) 240 days a year. The road over the mountain is often closed due to high winds. Especially the “col de tempêtes” (“storm pass”) just before the summit, which is known for its strong winds. The real origins of the name are thought to trace back to the 1st or 2nd century AD, when it was named ‘Vintur’ after a Gaulish god of the summits, or ‘Ven-Top’, meaning “snowy peak” in the ancient Gallic language. In the 10th century, the names Mons Ventosus and Mons Ventorius appear.

Mont Ventoux, although geologically part of the Alps, is often considered to be separate from them, due to the lack of mountains of a similar height nearby. It stands alone to the north of the Luberon range, separated by the Monts de Vaucluse, and just to the east of the Dentelles de Montmirail, its foothills. The top of the mountain is bare limestone without vegetation or trees, which makes the mountain’s barren peak appear from a distance to be snow-capped all year round (its snow cover actually lasts from December to April). Its isolated position overlooking the valley of the Rhône ensures that it dominates the entire region and can be seen from many miles away on a clear day.


Jun 18
3wings:

Piet Mondrian in his Studio, with “Broadway Boogie Woogie”, 1944
Fritz Glarner

3wings:

Piet Mondrian in his Studio, with “Broadway Boogie Woogie”, 1944

Fritz Glarner


Jun 17
grupaok:

Theatre Sarah-Bernhardt dancing with “cybernetic” robot sculptures by Nicolas Schöffer, 1956

grupaok:

Theatre Sarah-Bernhardt dancing with “cybernetic” robot sculptures by Nicolas Schöffer, 1956


Jun 16
grupaok:

Living Theatre, Paradise Now, Brooklyn Academy of Music, 1968

grupaok:

Living Theatre, Paradise Now, Brooklyn Academy of Music, 1968


Page 1 of 52